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Currently Reading

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
Tom Reiss, Paul Michael
Der Gesang der Wellen
Manuel Vicent
Son de Mar
Manuel Vicent
Progress: 12 %
Thomas Cromwell: A Life
Diarmaid MacCulloch, David Rintoul
Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea
Teffi, Irina Steinberg, Anne Marie Jackson, Robert Chandler, Elizabeth Chandler, Edythe C. Haber
Thomas Cromwell: A Life
Diarmaid MacCulloch
The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
Tom Reiss
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection
Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry

Recently Added

Blindsight - Peter Watts
A First-Class Temperament: The Emergence of Franklin Roosevelt, 1905-1928 - Geoffrey C. Ward
Two Old Women: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival - Velma Wallis
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Reading progress update: I've read 12%.

Son de Mar - Manuel Vicent Der Gesang der Wellen - Manuel Vicent

Finished the first chapter.  So far, this is shaping up as a story told with gentle irony -- foil rather than epee or broadsword. Several passages had me laughing out loud; I particularly like the juxtaposition of a Spanish seaside town somewhere south of Valencia at the full, exasperating and more than just a little ridiculous height of the summer tourist season with the fierceness and elegance of the story of Ulysses / Odysseus and Circe ... and Penelope (whose name here is Martina).

 

And I can already see that to me, this is also going to be an a study of translation.  I notice that the German translator -- while by and large fairly literal -- at least occasionally sets literal accuracy at naught in order to catch the spirit rather than the words; e.g., when inane lyrics such as

"Corazón de melón, de melón, melón, melón, corazón"

are rendered by the equally inane and rhythmically similar

"In meiner Brust schlägt die Lust, Lust, Lust, in meiner Brust"

-- never mind that the actual words are entirely different. (I bet Willi Zurbrüggen, the translator of the German edition, had a lot of fun looking for that one, and I actually wish he'd had that kind of courage a bit more often.)  And now, of course, I also want to know how that particular bit was dealt with in the English translation ...

 

Having just finished Sarah Bakewell's The Existentialist Café, one of the passages that had me laughing for reasons that the author may or may not have intended was this:

"Entre las personas que aguardaban al juez no había ningún filósofo. De ser así, mientras llogaba el informe oficial de la muerte, se pudo haber discutido de fenomenología, de la apariencia de los seres o de la realidad de los cuerpos presentes."

 

"Ein Philosoph befand sich nicht unter den Personen, die auf den Untersuchungsrichter warteten. Wäre dem so gewesen, hätte man, bis der Tod offiziell festgestellt war, die Zeit mit einer phänomenologischen Diskussion über die Gegeständlichkeit der Wesen oder die Wirklichkeit vorhandener Körper überbrücken können."

What goes around comes around!

 

(Though, I don't think "die Wirklichkeit vorhandener Körper" fully captures the meaning of "la realidad de los cuerpos presentes" , but anyway.)

 

Onwards to chapter 2, where we supposedly learn how this book's Odysseus and Penelope first met.

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/14 (Day 14): Halloween Bingo Reading Snacks and Drinks?

I don't know how much reading I'll be able to get done at home during this year's bingo, and doubtlessly part of it will be in bed before going to sleep, where I don't eat anything (and the only drink allowed is mineral water).

 

That said, as we established last year, tea is kind of a biggie in this household, and it's definitely my drink of choice while reading.  Especially now that I have such a nice mug to go with it ... thanks to BT's gift of earlier this year!

 

 

 

As a matter of fact, since a number of my (up to now) "go to" tea brands are English, and since I'm in absolutely no mood to pay the taxes that are looking ever more likely if the Bozo version of Brexit becomes a reality, a while ago I placed orders with my favorite British purveyors to tide me over for the foreseeable future, so now I'm right back to that "good grief, where do I store all this stuff?" situation.

 

 

As for food, there currently are no snacks in my home, but I'll have to go down to Frankfurt later this month, and I'll do my level  best to make time to swing by that store ... where I'll doubtlessly find a few extra delicious and not altogether too spooky treats to go with my tea!

 

 

Halloween Bingo: Book Selections

The Confessions of Frannie Langton - Sara Collins Pyramids - Nigel Planer, Terry Pratchett Where the Crawdads Sing - Cassandra Campbell, Delia Owens The Guilty Ones: A Jackman and Evans Thriller - Richard Armitage, Joy Ellis Siebengeschichten - Peter Kaempfe, Nina Blazon, Svenja Pages Evil Has a Name - Audible Studios Beloved - Toni Morrison Gods of Jade and Shadow - Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Yetta Gottesman Sorcerer to the Crown - Jenny Sterlin, Zen Cho The Dead Ringer: The Ambrose and Ed Hunter, Book 2 - Stefan Rudnicki, Fredric Brown

Like virtually all of my book consumption this year, my Halloween Bingo books are more or less necessarily going to have to be primarily audiobooks.  So I had a look at my Audible and CD collections what might fit the bill for my card, and here's what I've come up with (mostly new-to-me books but also a few rereads); currently most likely choices first, then the alternative choices in alphabetical order, and listing all books for every square where they match:

 

INTERNATIONAL WOMAN OF MYSTERY

Plenty of choices from the writings of white American and British women, so here I'm just going to list the non-U.S. and UK authors as well as the books by WoC.

 

Most likely:

* Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton

* Margaret Atwood: The Testaments

 

Alternatives:

* Margaret Atwood: The Robber Bride, The Handmaid's Tale, The Testaments
* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Trudi Canavan: The Magicians' Guild
* Edwidge Danticat: Krik? Krak!
* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow
* Toni Morrison: Beloved
* Sofi Oksanen: The Purge

 

 

LOCKED ROOM MYSTERY

Most likely:

* Nicholas Blake: Minute for Murder

* Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat

 

Alternatives:

* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Arthur Conan Doyle: The Golden Pince Nez, The Second Stain, The Bruce-Partington Plans, The Crooked Man, the Naval Treaty
* P.D. James: Unnatural Causes

 

 

DEADLANDS

Most likely:

* Terry Pratchett: Pyramids

 

Alternatives:

* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten

* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Edwidge Danticat: Krik? Krak!
* Elizabeth Kostova: The Historian
* Terry Pratchett: Eric
* Diane Setterfield: Once Upon a River
* Bram Stoker: Dracula

 

 

FEAR THE DROWNING DEEP

Most likely:

* Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing

 

Alternatives:

* Margery Allingham: Blackkerchief Dick
* Hans Christian Andersen: Fairy Tales
* J.M. Barrie: Peter Pan

* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut's Windlass
* Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, Halloween Party
* Freeman Wills Crofts: The Cask
* Edwidge Danticat: Krik? Krak!
* Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones
* Stephen Fry: Heroes
* Elizabeth George: Careless in Red
* P.D. James: Unnatural Causes, Devices and Desires
* Dennis Lehane: Shutter Island
* Anne McCaffrey: Dragonflight
* Michael McDowell: Blackwater
* Herman Melville: The Confidence-Men
* Diane Setterfield: Once Upon a River
* Mary Stewart: This Rough Magic
* Jay Stringer: Ways to Die in Glasgow

 

 

RELICS AND CURIOSITIES

Most likely:

* Patricia Wentworth: Eternity Ring

 

Alternatives:

* Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor
* Hans Christian Andersen: Fairy Tales
* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Trudi Canavan: The Magicians' Guild
* Agatha Christie: The Pale Horse, Halloween Party
* Freeman Wills Crofts: The Cask
* Edwidge Danticat: Krik? Krak!
* Jeffery Deaver: The Cold Moon
* Alexandre Dumas: The Three Musketeers
* Michael Ende: Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story)
* Ken Follett: Eye of the Needle
* Stephen Fry: Heroes
* Neil Gaiman: Fragile Things
* Michael Gilbert: Smallbone Deceased
* Jason Goodwin: The Janissary Tree
* Donna Leon: The Jewels of Paradise, The Golden Egg
* Scott Lynch: The Lies of Locke Lamora
* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow
* Ellis Peters: A Morbid Taste for Bones, The Devil's Novice
* Terry Pratchett: Wyrd Sisters, Pyramids
* Christopher Priest: The Prestige
* Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials
* Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat
* Mary Stewart: The Last Enchantment
* Josephine Tey: The Daughter of Time
* Barbara Vine: Asta's Book, A Dark-Adapted Eye
* Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray

 

 

DARK ACADEMIA

Most likely:

* James Hilton: Murder at School

* Donna Tartt: The Secret History

 

Alternatives:

* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Joanne Harris: Gentlemen and Players
* Michael Innes: Death at the President's Lodging
* Robert B. Parker: School Days
* Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials

 

 

MODERN NOIR

Most likely:

* Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones

 

Alternatives:

* Jay Bonansinga: The Sleep Police
* Ann Cleeves: The Crow Trap, Raven Black
* Jeffery Deaver: The Bone Collector, The Cold Moon
* Hugh Fraser: Harm
* Joanne Harris: Gentlemen and Players
* Anthony Horowitz: The Word is Murder
* Marlon James: A Brief History of Seven Killings
* Dennis Lehane: Shutter Island
* Jo Nesbø: Macbeth
* Robert B. Parker: School Days
* Ian Rankin: Rebus series
* Ruth Rendell: Some Lie and Some Die
* Peter Robinson: Gallows View, Wednesday's Child
* Jay Stringer: Ways to Die in Glasgow
* Donna Tartt: The Secret History
* C.J. Tudor: The Taking of Annie Thorne
* Minette Walters: Disordered Minds
* R.D. Wingfield: A Killing Frost
* Mystery Writers of America Presents: Vengeance
* Various Authors: MachUp

 

 

GHOST STORIES

Most likely:

* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten

 

Alternatives:

* Georgette Heyer: Footsteps in the Dark
* Michael McDowell: Blackwater

* Barbara Michaels: Witch

* Toni Morrison: Beloved
* Ellis Peters: A Morbid Taste for Bones
* Terry Pratchett: Wyrd Sisters, Pyramids

 

 

GOTHIC

Most likely:

* Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor

 

Alternatives:

* Marie Belloc Lowndes: The Lodger
* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights
* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Agatha Christie: The Pale Horse
* Wilkie Collins: The Woman in White
* Neil Gaiman: Fragile Things
* Thomas Hardy: The Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of the D'Urbervilles
* Victor Hugo: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
* Elizabeth Kostova: The Historian
* Michael McDowell: Blackwater
* Barbara Michaels: Witch

* Toni Morrison: Beloved
* Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing
* Christopher Priest: The Prestige
* Ann Radcliffe: The Mysteries of Udolpho
* Mary Roberts Rinehart: The Circular Staircase
* Diane Setterfield: Once Upon a River
* Mary Stewart: This Rough Magic
* Bram Stoker: Dracula
* Barbara Vine: The Blood Doctor, A Dark-Adapted Eye
* Patricia Wentworth: Pilgrim's Rest
* Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray

 

 

TRULY TERRIFYING

Most likely:

* Audible Original: Evil Has a Name

* Susan Orlean: The Library Book

 

Alternatives:

* Agatha Christie: Autobiography
* Neil Gaiman: The View from the Cheap Seats
* Christopher Hibbert: The Borgias and Their Enemies
* Sebastian Junger: The Perfect Storm
* Hesketh Pearson: Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life
* Patrick Radden Keefe: Say Nothing
* Bob Woodward: The Last of the President's Men, The Secret Man

 

 

CRYPTOZOOLOGIST

Most likely:

* Neil Gaiman: Fragile Things

* Terry Pratchett: Guards! Guards!

 

Alternatives:

* Arthur Conan Doyle: The Lost World
* Michael Ende: Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story)
* Stephen Fry: Heroes
* Anne McCaffrey: Dragonflight
* Victor Hugo: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
* Terry Pratchett: Pyramids, Guards! Guards!
* Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials
* Bram Stoker: Dracula
* J.R.R. Tolkien: The Children of Húrin, Tales from the Perilous Realm

 

 

DIVERSE VOICES

Most likely:

* Toni Morrison: Beloved

 

Alternatives:

* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown
* Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
* Edwidge Danticat: Krik? Krak!
* Alexandre Dumas: The Three Musketeers
* Marlon James: A Brief History of Seven Killings
* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow

 

 

BLACK CAT

Most likely:

* Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut's Windlass
* Barbara Michaels: Witch

 

Alternatives:

* Sofie Ryan: The Whole Cat and Caboodle
* Various Authors: Magicats
* Various Authors: Feline Felonies

 

 

CREEPY CRAWLIES

Most likely:

* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow

 

Alternatives:

* Arthur Conan Doyle: The Lion's Mane
* Stephen Fry: Heroes
* Victor Hugo: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
* Rudyard Kipling: The Jungle Book
* Alexander McCall Smith: The Girl Who Married a Lion
* Terry Pratchett: Pyramids
* Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials
* Bram Stoker: Dracula

 

 

COUNTRY HOUSE MYSTERY

Most likely:

* Anna Katherine Green: The Leavenworth Case

* Anthony Rolls: Scarweather

 

Alternatives:

* Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery
* Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, The Pale Horse, Curtain, Halloween Party
* Wilkie Collins: The Woman in White
* Matthew Costello, Neil Richards: Cherringham
* Arthur Conan Doyle: The Naval Treaty, The Return of Sherlock Holmes (several stories), His Last Bow (several stories)
* Elizabeth George: Careless in Red, This Body of Death, Believing the Lie
* Georgette Heyer: The Unfinished Clue, Footsteps in the Dark
* P.D. James: Unnatural Causes
* Mary Roberts Rinehart: The Circular Staircase
* Diane Setterfield: Once Upon a River
* Patricia Wentworth: Pilgrim's Rest

 

 

SPELLBOUND

Most likely:

* Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown

 

Alternatives:

* Hans Christian Andersen: Fairy Tales
* J.M. Barrie: Peter Pan
* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut's Windlass
* Trudi Canavan: The Magicians' Guild
* Agatha Christie: The Pale Horse
* Michael Ende: Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story)
* Jennifer Estep: Kill the Queen
* Stephen Fry: Heroes
* Neil Gaiman: Fragile Things
* Lois McMaster Bujold: The Curse of Chalion
* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow
* Terry Pratchett: Wyrd Sisters, Maskerade, Pyramids
* Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials
* Diane Setterfield: Once Upon a River
* Mary Stewart: The Last Enchantment
* J.R.R. Tolkien: The Children of Húrin, Tales from the Perilous Realm
* Various Authors: Magicats

 

 

A GRIMM TALE

Most likely:

* Stephen Fry: Heroes

 

Alternatives:

* Hans Christian Andersen: Fairy Tales
* Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten
* Neil Gaiman: Fragile Things
* Alexander McCall Smith: The Girl Who Married a Lion
* Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow

* Mary Stewart: The Last Enchantment

 

 

CREEPY CARNIVALS

Most likely:

* Fredric Brown: The Dead Ringer

 

Alternatives:
* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Arthur Conan Doyle: The Veiled Lodger
* Christopher Priest: The Prestige
* Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat

 

 

PAINT IT BLACK

Most likely:

* Trudi Canavan: The Magicians' Guild

 

Alternatives:

* Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery, Blackkerchief Dick
* Nicholas Blake: Minute for Murder, Thou Shell of Death, The Beast Must Die
* Agatha Christie: The Pale Horse
* Ann Cleeves: Raven Black
* Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
* Wilkie Collins: The Woman in White
* Michael Crichton: The Great Train Robbery
* Thomas Hardy: The Mayor of Casterbridge
* Anthony Horowitz: The Word is Murder
* Marlon James: A Brief History of Seven Killings
* Elizabeth Kostova: The Historian
* Scott Lynch: The Lies of Locke Lamora
* Lois McMaster Bujold: The Curse of Chalion
* Toni Morrison: Beloved
* Mario Puzo: The Godfather
* Ruth Rendell: Some Lie and Some Die, Simisola
* Peter Robinson: Wednesday's Child
* Donna Tartt: The Secret History
* C.J. Tudor: The Taking of Annie Thorne
* Barbara Vine: The Blood Doctor, Asta's Book, A Dark-Adapted Eye
* Various Authors: Classic Crime Short Stories

 

 

Squares for which I've already got too many options to list them all here:

 

Finally, since I've found books for all of my card's squares, I don't currently expect to be using my transformation spells.  If during the game I decide I'm not in the mood for any of the book choices listed here, though, these are the squares (currently without associated books) from which, as of right now, I'd most likely make my replacement / transformation selection:

 

 

 

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/13 (Day 13): New Releases?

The Raven Tower - Ann Leckie The Testaments - Margaret Atwood Gods of Jade and Shadow - Silvia Moreno-Garcia The Night Fire - Michael Connelly

One recommendation and three expectations:

 

Ann Leckie - The Raven Tower: That rare beast of a newly-released book that worked for me on every level despite all the hype attached to it.  Fantasy / supernatural, but without the usual menagerie of magical beasts: instead, an alternative early medieval society and its (very much alive) gods, with a truly awesome narrator. My review is HERE.

 

Margaret Atwood - The Testaments: The new release I'm looking at with the greatest amount of trepidation, because come on, how do you match something as iconic and monumental as The Handmaid's Tale ... even as that book's own author?

 

Silvia Moreno-Garcia - Gods of Jade and Shadow: The book that, thanks to Chris's review, instantly made it onto a good number of Halloween Bingo reading lists; including mine.  A modernized (well, sort of) retelling of the Popol Vuh rendered in a storyteller's voice, what's not to like?

 

And, finally:

 

Michael Connelly - The Night Fire: Connelly never lets up and his writing is still as crisp as on day one.  Bosch and Ballard return as a team (I'm very much hoping as a team only), moonlighting in the investigation of a cold case Bosch has "inherited" from his recently-deceased mentor. -- Side note: I've been bingeing on the Bosch TV series while compiling my "Halloween Bingo pre-party" posts up to now, which of course has only served to increase my anticipation of this particular book.

 

 

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/12 (Day 12): Classic Crime and Classic Horror Recommendations?

Gaudy Night - Dorothy L. Sayers Brat Farrar - Josephine Tey The Haunted Monastery (Judge Dee Series) - Robert H. van Gulik Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury Goblin Market - Christina Rossetti Who Killed Robert Prentice? - Dennis Wheatley The Dykemaster - Theodor Storm The Signalman: A Ghost Story - Charles Dickens, Simon Bradley Hauff's Fairy Tales - Wilhelm Hauff The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

Late to today's party and most of my really big favorites have already made an appearance in other folks' posts, so I figured I'll just list mine and showcase at the top of my post some of the books that haven't yet been highlighted by others.  By bingo category, with suspense and mysteries together in one block and an extra block for the children's books instead:

 

MYSTERIES / SUSPENSE

Dorothy L. Sayers: Lord Peter Wimsey series, especially the Wimsey & Vane subseries / quartet

Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes series
Agatha Christie: Poirot, Miss Marple and Tommy & Tuppence series, The Witness for the Prosecution, The Mousetrap, And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Towards Zero, The Sittaford Mystery
Patricia Wentworth: Miss Silver series
Ngaio Marsh: Roderick Alleyn series
Josephine Tey: Brat Farrar, The Daughter of Time, The Franchise Affair
John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
Anthony Wynne: Murder of a Lady
Mavis Doriel Hay: The Santa Klaus Murder
Georgette Heyer: Envious Casca
Robert van Gulik: Judge Dee series
Georges Simenon: Maigret series
Graham Greene: The Third Man
John Mortimer: Rumpole series
Ruth Rendell: Inspector Wexford series
P.D. James: Inspector Dalgliesh series
Dennis Wheatley: Who Killed Robert Prentice?
Q. Patrick: File on Fenton and Farr
Mary Roberts Rinehart: Locked Doors
Rex Stout: Nero Wolfe series
Patricia Highsmith: The Talented Mr. Ripley
Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep
Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
Cornell Woolrich: Rear Window, The Bride Wore Black
James M. Cain: Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice
John Dudley Ball: In the Heat of the Night
Mario Puzo: The Godfather
Neil Simon, H.R.F. Keating: Murder by Death

 

 

SUPERNATURAL (FANTASY, SCIENCE FICTION), DYSTOPIA
William Shakespeare: The Tempest
J.R.R. Tolkien: The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings
C.S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia
Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale
George Orwell: 1984
Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
Philip K. Dick: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Sheri S. Tepper: The True Game
Alfred Lord Tennyson: The Lady of Shalott

 

 

GOTHIC & HORROR
William Shakespeare: Macbeth
Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey
Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre
Anne Brontë: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
Daphne Du Maurier: Rebecca
Christina Rossetti: Goblin Market
Charles Dickens: Bleak House, A Christmas Carol, The Signalman
Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Canterville Ghost
Wilkie Collins: The Moonstone
Theodor Storm: Der Schimmelreiter (The Dykemaster)
Edith Wharton: Ghost Stories
Edgar Allan Poe: The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Raven, The Mask of the Red Death
Bram Stoker: Dracula
Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
Robert Louis Stevenson: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Henry James: The Turn of the Screw
Shirley Jackson: The Lottery, We Have Always Lived in the Castle

 

 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS
Otfried Preußler: The Little Witch, The Little Ghost
Robert Arthur, et al.: The Three Investigators series
T.H. White: The Sword in the Stone
Wilhelm Hauff: Fairy Tales

 

 

This year's essential Halloween Bingo equipment arrived -- thank you so much, OB!

Aren't they just gorgeous?

 


They're also officially cat-approved.

(Don't worry, OB.  Thy survived the inspection unblemished -- otherwise there would have been hell to pay here.)

 


What do you mean, "They're not for us???"

 

Though of course ...


Nothing says "Halloween" like a picture of pumpkin socks being photobombed by a (mostly) black cat!

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/09 (Day 9): Book Suggestions for the New Squares? Part 2

Gaudy Night - Dorothy L. Sayers The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood Seven Gothic Tales (Penguin Modern Classics) - Isak Dinesen In the Woods  - Tana French Crooked House - Agatha Christie Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil - John Berendt The Bride Wore Black - William Irish, Cornell Woolrich Their Lost Daughters - Joy Ellis, Richard Armitage A Great Deliverance - Elizabeth  George Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption: A Story from Different Seasons - Stephen King

DARK ACADEMIA

Somehow, British universities and public schools seem to provide a particularly fertile ground for this sort of story:

 

* Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night (Oxford University)
* Agatha Christie: Cat Among the Pigeons (private girls' school)
* Nicholas Blake: A Question of Proof (public school)
* Edmund Crispin: The Moving Toyshop (Oxford University)
* James Hilton: Murder at School (public school)
* Michael Innes: Death at the President's Lodging (fictional college)
* P.D. James: Death in Holy Orders (priests' seminary)
* P.D. James: Shroud for a Nightingale (nursing school)
* Elizabeth George: Well-Schooled in Murder (public school)
* Elizabeth George: For the Sake of Elena (Cambridge University)
* Colin Dexter: Inspector Morse series (Oxford University)
* Susanna Gregory: Matthew Bartholomew series (Cambridge University, 14h century)
* Ian Morson: William Falconer series (Oxford University, 13th century)
* Shirley Mckay: Hue and Cry (St. Andrews University, 16th century)

 

 

DYSTOPIAN HELLSCAPE

My quartet of must-read dystopian novels has so far consisted of:

 

* George Orwell: 1984
* Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
* Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
* Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale

 

Obviously, with the impending release of Atwood's The Testaments, there might now be a fifth book to add to that group -- for the moment it's on my TBR.

 

 

INTERNATIONAL WOMAN OF MYSTERY

Based on the definition of this square, all U.S. authors are "international for UK readers and vice versa, and both of them are "international" for me.  We all have plenty of favorite women writers from both of these countries -- so here are a few from elsewhere (based on MR's definition of this square as an outrcrop of "Terrifying Women"; i.e., writers whose books fit any of the Halloween Bingo categories):

 

* Zen Cho (Malaysia, UK)

* Donna Leon (Italy, U.S.)

* Dolores Redondo (Spain)

* Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Mexico, Canada)

* Isabel Allende (Chile; now also U.S.)

* Edwidge Danticat (Haiti)

* George Sand (France): novel La mare au diable (The Devil's Pool)

* Emmuska Orczy (Hungary, France, UK)

* Nina Blazon (Germany, Slovenia)

* Juli Zeh (Germany): novel Schilf (Dark Matter)

* Helene Tungsten (Sweden)

* Karin Fossum (Norway)
* Isak Dinesen (aka Karen / Tania Blixen) (Denmark, Kenya)

* Sofi Oksanen (Estonia): novel The Purge (Fegefeuer)

* Tana French (Ireland; going by nationality also U.S.)

 

 

PSYCH

Hoo boy.  Sooo many great books -- there is a seriously immense amount of f*cked up people walking around in in literatureland.  (Including authors messing with their readers' minds.)

 

* Agatha Christie: By the Pricking of My Thumbs, Endless Night, And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Murder Is Easy, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Edgar Allan Poe: Pretty much anything he ever wrote -- to begin with The System of Dr. Tarr and Professor Feather, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Oval Portrait, and Annabelle Lee
* Charles Dickens: The Signalman
* Robert Louis Stevenson: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
* Washington Irving: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
* Henry James: The Turn of the Screw
* E.T.A. Hoffmann: Der Sandmann (The Sandman)
* Shirley Jackson: The Lottery and We Have Always Lived in the Castle
* Cornell Woolrich: The Bride Wore Black
* Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep
* Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
* Michael Connelly: The Concrete Blonde, The Poet, Blood Work, A Darkness More Than Night, The Narrows
* George Pelecanos: Shame the Devil
* Dennis Lehane: Mystic River
* Ann Leckie: The Raven Tower
* Elizabeth George: A Suitable Vengeance and A Great Deliverance
* Joy Ellis: Jackman and Evans series
* Peter May: The Blackhouse and Coffin Road
* Ian Rankin: Knots and Crosses, Tooth and Nail, Black and Blue, Dead Souls
* Val McDermid: Carol Jordan and Tony Hill series, A Place of Execution
* Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling): The Silkworm, Career of Evil
* P.D. James: Devices and Desires
* Barbara Vine: A Dark-Adapted Eye
* Minette Walters: The Ice House
* Margery Allingham: Death of a Ghost and The Case of the Late Pig
* Kazuo Ishiguro: Never Let Me Go
* Anthony Horowitz: The House of Silk
* Iain Pears: An Instance of the Fingerpost, Stone's Fall, The Portrait
* C.J. Sansom: Revelation
* Ellis Peters: A Morbid Taste for Bones, The Hermit of Eyton Forest, The Devil's Novice

* Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose

* Tana French: In the Woods
* Karin Fossum: He Who Fears the Wolf
* Joe Nesbø: The Snowman

 

 

TRULY TERRIFYING
* John Berendt: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
* Truman Capote: In Cold Blood
* Norman Mailer: The Executioner's Song
* Joseph D. Pistone: Donnie Brasco
* David Simon: Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets
* Miles Corwin: The Killing Season : A Summer Inside an LAPD Homicide Division
* Barry Scheck, Jim Dwyer, Peter Neufeld: Actual Innocence
* Sr. Helen Prejean: Dead Man Walking
* Steve Bogira: Courtroom 302: A Year Behind the Scenes in an American Criminal Courthouse
* Jonathan Harr: A Civil Action

* Joseph Wambaugh: The Onion Field

* Edward Humes: Mississippi Mud
* Joe McGinniss: Blind Faith
* Lowell Cauffiel: Eye of the Beholder
* Nicholas Pileggi: Casino
* Michael Connelly: Crime Beat: Stories of Cops and Killers, and Murder in Vegas
* Harold Schecter: True Crime: An American Anthology
* Christiane F.: Wir Kinder Vom Bahnhof Zoo (Autobiography of a Girl of the Streets)
* Eric Jager: Blood Royal: A True Tale of Crime and Detection in Medieval Paris
* Kate Summerscale: The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
* P.D. James: The Maul and the Pear Tree: The Ratcliffe Highway Murders, 1811
* Victoria Blake: Mrs. Maybrick
* Angus McLaren: A Prescription for Murder: The Victorian Serial Killings of Dr. Thomas Neill Cream
* Judith Flanders: The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime
* William Roughead: Classic Crimes
* Members of the Detection Club: Anatomy of Murder, and More Anatomy of Murder
* Kathryn Harkup: A Is For Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie

* David Suchet: Poirot and Me

* William S. Baring-Gould: Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street: A Life of the World's First Consulting Detective

* Vincent Starrett: The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

* Martin Fido: The World of Sherlock Holmes

* Michael Cox: The Baker Street File: A Guide to the Appearance and Habits of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson

* David Stuart Davies: Bending the Willow: Jeremy Brett As Sherlock Holmes

* David L. Hammer: The Travelers' Companion to the London of Sherlock Holmes

* Scene of the Crime: A Guide to the Landscapes of British Detective Fiction
* Richard Lindberg: Return to the Scene of the Crime: A Guide to Infamous Places in Chicago
* Alain Silver, Elizabeth Ward: Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles
* Eddie Muller: Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir
* Jim Garrison: On the Trail of the Assassins
* Hannah Arendt: Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
* Louise Arbour: War Crimes and the Culture of Peace
* Richard J. Goldstone: For Humanity: Reflections of a War Crimes Investigator
* Clea Koff: The Bone Woman: A Forensic Anthropologist's Search for Truth in the Mass Graves of Rwanda, Bosnia, Croatia, and Kosovo
* Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams: Peace with Justice?: War Crimes and Accountability in the Former Yugoslavia
* Gary Jonathan Bass: Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals
* Judith Armatta: Twilight of Impunity: The War Crimes Trial of Slobodan Milošević

 

 

KING OF FEAR

Stephen King's own works:

* Carrie
* Misery
* Pet Semetary

* The Shining
* The Long Walk

* Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption

* On Writing

 

From King's recommendations in On Writing, as listed HERE, HERE and HERE:

* Michael Connelly: The Poet and The Narrows
* Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
* Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude
* Elizabeth George: Deception on His Mind
* Peter Høeg: Smilla’s Sense of Snow
* Stieg Larsson: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
* Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird
* Dennis Lehane: The Given Day
* George Pelecanos: Hard Revolution
* J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s (Philosopher's) Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

 

 

FILM AT 11

I guess most people here know my likes when it comes to movie and TV adaptations, but anyway ...

 

Stand-alone books adapted as stand-alone movies:

* Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Witness for the Prosecution, Why Didn't They Ask Evans?
* Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey
* Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre
* Anne Brontë: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
* Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights
* Daphne Du Maurier: Rebecca
* Charles Dickens: Bleak House and A Christmas Carol
* Bram Stoker: Dracula
* Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
* Anne Rice: Interview with the Vampire
* John Fowles: The French Lieutenant's Woman
* Isabel Allende: The House of the Spirits
* John Berendt: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
* Sr. Helen Prejean: Dead Man Walking
* Stephen King: (Rita Hayworth and) the Shawshank Redemption, Carrie, Misery, The Shining

* S.S. Van Dine: The Kennel Murder Case

* Graham Greene: The Third Man

* Cornell Woolrich: Rear Window
* John Dudley Ball: In the Heat of the Night
* John Gregory Dunne: True Confessions
* Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
* James M. Cain: Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice
* Elmore Leonard: Get Shorty
* John Grisham: The Firm, The Client, A Time to Kill, The Pelican Brief
* Frederick Forsyth: The Day of the Jackal
* Barbara Vine: A Dark-Adapted Eye, Gallowglass, A Fatal Inversion
* Minette Walters: The Ice House

* Ethel Lina White: The Lady Vanishes

* Barry Unsworth: Morality Play

* Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose

* Peter Høeg: Smilla's Sense of Snow

* George Orwell: 1984

* Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

 

Book series installments made into stand-alone movies or vice versa:

* Agatha Christie: Poirot: Murder on the Orient Express (Albert Finney); as well as Death on the Nile and Appointment with Death (Peter Ustinov)

* Agatha Christie: Bundle Brent / Superintendent Battle: The Seven Dials Mystery (Cheryl Campbell, James Warwick)

* Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale

* Walter Mosley: Devil in a Blue Dress

* James Ellroy: L.A. Confidential

* Raymond Chandler: Marlowe: The Big Sleep, Farewell My Lovely, The Lady in the Lake, The Long Goodbye (with different actors starring as Marlowe)
* Dashiell Hammett: The Thin Man (original movie and 5 sequels)

* Mario Puzo: The Godfather (3 movies)

* Tony Hillerman: The Dark Wind (Fred Ward, Lou Diamond Phillips)

 

Book series adapted as TV series or sequential movies:

* J.R.R. Tolkien: The Lord of the Rings

* C.S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia

* J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter

* Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes (Jeremy Brett, David Burke / Edward Hardwicke)
* Dorothy L. Sayers: Lord Peter Wimsey (two series: Wimsey / Vane: Harriet Walter & Edward Petherbridge; Wimsey solo: Ian Carmichael)
* Agatha Christie: Poirot (David Suchet, Hugh Fraser), Miss Marple (Joan Hickson), Tommy & Tuppence (Francesca Annis & James Warwick)
* E.G. Hornung: Raffles
* Ngaio Marsh: Inspector Alleyn (Patrick Malahide)
* Margery Allingham: Campion (Peter Davidson)
* P.D. James: Inspector Dalgliesh (Roy Marsden; 2 episodes: Martin Shaw)

* Ruth Rendell: Inspector Wexford (George Baker, Christopher Ravenscroft)
* Ellis Peters: Brother Cadfael (Derek Jacobi)
* Colin Dexter: Morse (John Thaw, Kevin Whately; including TV spin-offs: Endeavour (Shaun Evans) and Lewis (Kevin Whately, Laurence Fox))
* Elizabeth George: Inspector Lynley (Nathaniel Parker, Sharon Small)
* Ian Rankin: Rebus (2 series; John Hannah and later Ken Stott)
* John Morimer: Rumpole of the Bailey (Leo McKern)
* Caroline Graham: Midsomer Murders (John Nettles, later Neil Dudgeon)

* Henning Mankell: Wallander (2 adaptations: 1 series starring Kenneth Branagh; 1 series co-produced in Sweden and Germany)

* Stieg Larsson: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and sequels

* Michael Connelly: Bosch (Titus Weilliver)

* Tony Hillerman: Skinwalkers, Coyote Waits, and A Thief of Time (Wes Studi, Adam Beach)

* Craig Johnson: Longmire (Robert Taylor, Lou Diamond Phillips)

* Rex Stout: Nero Wolfe (Maury Chaykin, Timothy Hutton)

 

Honorary mention: Murder by Death; novelized by H.R.F. Keating and Neil Simon.  Its not a book-to-movie adaptation (rather the reverse), so going by the definition for the square it probably doesn't count, but this list just wouldn't be complete without it.

 

 

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/09 (Day 9): Book Suggestions for the New Squares? Part 1: "Paint It Black"

Complete Tales and Poems - Edgar Allan Poe Wyrd Sisters - Terry Pratchett, Celia Imrie Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Gryffindor Edition - ROWLING J.K. Black Roses - Jane Thynne The Bride Wore Black - William Irish, Cornell Woolrich The Raven Tower - Ann Leckie The Signalman: A Ghost Story - Charles Dickens, Simon Bradley The Poet - Michael Connelly The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Original Movie Script - Jim Sharman, Richard O'Brien The Godfather - Mario Puzo

Today's prompt is for favorite horror reads; that not being much of my thing (outside, perhaps, the gothic classics and anything more edifying or funny rather than scary), I think I'm going to leave that prompt to Char, Bark's Books (aka Bark at the Ghouls), and the site's other horror fans.  Instead, I'm going to catch up on the prompt from the day before yesterday -- I'm really, really excited about the new squares.

 

This is going to be another multiple-post reply ... because come on, these covers are just too beautiful not to give them a space of their own!

 

                                           

 

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/10 (Day 10): Most Anticipated Read for 2019?

The Testaments - Margaret Atwood Where the Crawdads Sing - Delia Owens The Guilty Ones: A Jackman and Evans Thriller - Richard Armitage, Joy Ellis Wine of Violence: A Medieval Mystery #1: An Historical Mystery (Medieval Mysteries) - Priscilla Royal

MR suggested a group or buddy read of Margaret Atwood's The Testaments -- I'd definitely be up for that.  (Ditto Toni Morrison's Beloved, if it comes to that.)  If I can work up the nerve, I may reread The Handmaid's Tale prior to bingo just so as to have the continuity experience; either way, I'm definitely planning to read The Testaments.

 

Delia Owens's Where the Crawdads Sing is the kind of immensely hyped book that I would ordinarily not touch for another year or two at least, just to see how much staying power it has once the hype has died off.  But it's been reviewed favorably -- enthusiastically even -- by several people whose opinion I trust, so now I actually do want to see what all the excitement is about.

 

Joy Ellis's The Guilty Ones is book 4 in her Jackman and Evans series, the second book of which completely blew me away during last year's bingo to the point that I've since also listened to all the other books from the series that have been released on audio to date.  While my first experience (Their Lost Daughters) still remains unsurpassed, the series has fast become a new favorite and each new release is eagerly anticipated.  (Obviously it also helps that all of the audiobooks are narrated by Richard Armitage.)

 

And Priscilla Royal's 13th century Prioress Eleanor / Tyndal Priory series has been on my TBR for a minor eternity, so I'm really hoping I'll finally be able to make room for it this time around!

 

(NB: Post(s) for yesterday's prompt still in production ... )

 

 

BL-opoly: And That's a Wrap!

 A HUGE thank you to Moonlight Reader and Obsidian Blue for hosting another fabulous game -- I had a total blast!

 

Final Stats

Final status of my bank account: $181

 

37 books counting towards the game

* 35 books finished

* 2 DNFs

* 11,640 pages read

 

Somehow I managed to steer clear of jail and visit all except five squares of the board over the course of the game, a few of them even repeatedly.  The only novelty card I never picked up was the cat -- I suspect the BL-opoly gods decided there were enough cats in my game already and they needed to redress the balance by giving me three Scottie dogs instead!

 

A few more stats:

 

Books read towards my individual challenges:

* Around the World in 80 Books - 26 books (incl. 2 DNF)

   - of these, 2 books by Native American authors

   - and 13 books (incl. 2 DNF) by authors from / set in countries other than the UK and U.S.

 

* 221b Baker Street and Beyond (aka Summer of Sherlock): 2 books

   (+ 1 book read outside BL-opoly)

* Summer of Spies (Redux): 2books

* Mystery Classics: 7 books

 

The Gender Wars:

* Books by female authors: 19

* Books by male authors: 18

 

My marker was based (of course) on my little assistants and good luck charms, Sunny and Charlie, who were again helping me pick my books.

  

 

My Progress Spreadsheet

 

 

The Books and the Board

The Questions

Who?: Ellis Peters: Monk's Hood - finished July 2, 2019.

Why?: Gertrude Bell: A Woman in Arabia - finished August 2, 2019.

How?: Julia Alvarez: How the García Girls Lost Their Accents - finished May 26.

Douglas Adams: The HItchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - finished June 27, 2019.

Wendy Moore: Wedlock: How Georgian Britain's Worst Husband Met His Match - finished July 11, 2019.

When?: C.J. Sansom: Tombland - finished July 1, 2019.

 

The Railroads

The Silk Road: Banine: Days in the Caucasus - finished August 9, 2019.

The Patagonia Star: Laura Restrepo: Hot Sur - DNF @ p. 55 July 25, 2019.

The Cape-to-Cairo Railway: Kofi Annan: Interventions - finished May 30, 2019.

Aminatta Forna: The Memory of Love - finished June 16, 2019.

The Nordic Express: Cary Elwes: As You Wish - finished August 7, 2019.

 

School's Out For Summer

#1: Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility - finished June 3, 2019.

#3: Frank Froest: The Grell Mystery - finished June 5, 2019.

#4: ./.

 

The Stay-Cation

#6: John Le Carré: A Small Town in Germany - finished July 29, 2019.

#7: Miles Burton: The Secret of High Eldersham - finished May 21, 2019.

      J.K. Rowling: The Casual Vacancy - finished July 14, 2019.

#9: John Le Carré: A Murder of Quality - finished June 19, 2019.

      Chingiz Aitmatov: Jamilia - finished July 3, 2019.

      Ann Leckie: The Raven Tower - finished July 23, 2019.

 

Beach Week

#10: Renee Ahdieh: The Wrath and the Dawn - DNF @ p. 146 July 31, 2019.

#11: Julian Symons: The Belting Inheritance - finished June 6, 2019.

#12:

 

Mountain Cabin

#15: Louise Erdrich: The Plague of Doves - finished May 23, 2019.

        Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman: Good Omens - finished July 16, 2019.

#16: Ellen Wilkinson: The Division Bell Mystery - finished May 28, 2019.

        Georgette Heyer: A Blunt Instrument - finished June 8, 2019.

        Ronald Knox: The Body in the Silo - finished June 21, 2019.

#18: James D. Doss: The Night Visitor - finished July 5, 2019.

 

The Lake House:

#19: Margaret Atwood: Hag-Seed - finished May 25, 2019.

#20: Winifred Holtby: South Riding - finished July 10, 2019.

        M.M. Kaye: Death in Kashmir - finished July 19, 2019.

#22: Richard Hull: The Murder of My Aunt - finished June 24, 2019.

 

The Summer Blockbuster

#25: Witi Ihimaera: The Whale Rider - finished May 31, 2019.

#27: ./.

 

The Summer Romance

#28: ./.

#30: ./.

 

European Vacation

#33: Ronald Knox: The Three Taps - finished May 31, 2019.

#35: Israel Zangwill: The Perfect Crime, aka The Big Bow Mystery - finished June 16, 2019.

        Andrea Camilleri: The Shape of Water - finished July 20, 2019.

#36: Candace Robb: The Apothecary Rose - finished July 26, 2019.

 

The Novelty Cards

The Race Car: Picked up on May 24; used on August 8.

The Robot: Picked up on July 2; used on July 31.

The Cat: ./.

The Dog: Picked up on July 2, July 19 and July 23; used on July 19, July 29 and August 6.

 

The Four Corners

GO: Collected $20 on May 20; and $5 each on:

May 24 - June 1 - June 9 - July 1 - July 2 - July 19 - July 27 - August 8.

 

Jail: ./.

Free Parking: July 23: dice roll: 8 => Scottie Dog.

Go to Jail: ./.

 

The BookLikes Squares:

Spin the Wheel Decide

#24: August 2: Read a book that has been on your TBR for over a year. (Sarah Bakewell: At the Existentialist Café - finished August 6, 2019.)

#31: May 24: Move to the space of your choice.

(→ Race car via GO)

June 9: Two extra rolls.

 

Look ... Isn't it a beauty??

Reading progress update: I've read 100%.

Days in the Caucasus - Banine Days in the Caucasus - Banine, Anoushka Rava

Well, looks like I was tempting fate after all.  As it turns out, not every memoir set in the former USSR in the years before and during the Russian Revolution was really shouting out to be written.  This is definitely one such -- which is particularly disappointing as the writer's father was a leading Azerbaijani (oil) industrialist and a minister in the short-lived 1918-19 Azerbaijan Democratic Republic.  I realize that Banine was a child during the years that she describes in this book (up to her emigration to Paris in 1923 at age 18), but she was an adult woman when she sat down to write it some 20 years later, and for her memoir nevertheless to contain no more than an extremely superficial description of the political circumstances of the day, absolutely zero analysis (political or otherwise), and instead a relation solely from the perspective of her spoiled child-self of those years is pretty underwhelming.  This could have been so much more.

 

As a side note, Anoushka Rava is going straight onto my list of "never again" narrators.  Note to publisher: A narrator with no ears for narrative rhythm, flow and texture does decidedly not add to the authenticity of the narration, for however much their accent may (presumably) resemble that of the author when speaking a foreign language.  It is also emphatically not necessary to spend nine hours yelling at the reader / listener in order to convey the impression of a household in which conversations conducted at that level of vocal exertion (equally exercised by all speakers, and moreover at the same time) was apparently the norm.

All 61 squares revealed: 1 through 18

All of the new squares (and scares) have been revealed, and I got these posts put together over the past few days, so I'm ready to reveal ALL OF THE SQUARES!

 

Buckle up, butter cup.

 

A note on book lists: where we have already got a working book list, I've linked to it. However, word of clarification: the rules have changed a bit in the last 3 years - so not every book on the booklists is necessarily a horror, supernatural, mystery or suspense book. If it shows up on a booklist it has been approved for game play on that space and is "grandfathered in" to eligibility.

 

The new categories don't have a book list associated with them yet.

 

I am going to do this in three posts, because they are going to be very long! You've seen the 9 new squares:

 

  

 

1. Dark Academia: Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror that takes place at a school - high school, college, boarding school, etc.

2. Dystopian Hellscape: This is a multi-genre square! Any book that relates to the fictional depiction of a dystopian society, such as The Handmaid's Tale or The Hunger Games, would qualify! 

3. International Woman of Mystery: This one is fairly obvious and is a twist on the "Terrifying Women" of years past - the only question is what does "international" mean? Basically, it means international to you - the reader. I'm in the U.S., so "international" means women mystery authors from Europe, South America, Asia, etc...

 

  

 

4. Psych: Psychological thrillers, plot twists and suspense, unreliable narrators and other mind-fuckery. And, as an aside, any Halloween Bingo book that takes place within or related to an insane asylum, haunted or otherwise, would qualify!

5. Truly Terrifying: Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me - just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

6. Paint It Black: Any book with a cover that is primarily black or has the word black in the title, was written by a black author, or relates to rock and roll music.

 

  

 

 

7. Stranger Things: this is a twist on the past 80's Horror square with elements of the television show  - any horror that has supernatural elements, portal/parallel universes, government plots gone awry or is set or was written in the 1980's. 

8. Film at 11:  The idea for this new space comes courtesy of Linda Hilton! Generally, in order to qualify for Halloween bingo, all books must fit into one of the general genres of horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural. This space is filled by any Halloween bingo book that has been adapted to film or television. For extra fun, you can watch the adaptation - although this is an optional add on!

9. King of Fear: You can read anything written by Stephen King or Joe Hill, or recommended by Stephen King (as long as the recommendation is otherwise eligible for Halloween Bingo). 

 

The "horror" squares:

 

  

 

10. Genre: Horror: Anything that qualifies as horror. Book list linked here.

11. Southern Gothic: horror set in the Southern part of the United States; Book list linked here

12. Modern Masters of Horror: horror published in or after 2000. Book list linked here. See horror booklist - notes identify sub-categories.

 

  

 

13. Fear Street: 1980's and 1990's vintage pulp-style series horror, targeted to teens, such as Point Horror, Fear Street and horror fiction that is written/published primarily for a YA or MG audience. Examples would include The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey. Book list linked here

14. Terror in a Small Town: any horror book where the action primarily occurs in a small town or village. Examples would include: Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, It by Stephen King. Book list linked here

15. Slasher Stories: books that share the tropes of classic slasher movies: teen characters, indestructible killers and/or multiple victims. Book list linked here

 

   

 

16. Classic Horror: horror fiction that was published prior to 1980; Book list linked here

17. American Horror Story: horror set in the United States. See horror booklist - notes identify sub-categories.

19. Stone Cold Horror: this is a late addition because I had too much YA horror, so I combined a couple of categories into Fear Street & needed something else for the horror genre! Horror that takes place primarily in a winter/cold/snow type setting. 

 

 

Reblogged from Moonlight Murder

All 61 squares revealed: 19 through 38

The Mystery & Supernatural squares!

 

The Mystery Squares:

 

  

 

19. Genre: Mystery: anything that fits into the mystery genre. Book list linked here.

20. Amateur Sleuth: this mystery will have a main character who is not a member of law enforcement. This can include retired police officers and private detectives. Book list linked here.

21. Baker Street Irregulars: mystery that involves children/teens in crime solving. Book list linked here.

 

 

  

 

 

22. Classic Noir: mysteries published prior to 1980 with noir elements, including authors like Raymond Chandler, Cornell Woolrich and Dashiell Hammett. Book list linked here.

23. Country House Mystery:  a closed circle murder set during a gathering like a house party. Book list linked here.

24. Cozy Mystery:  a subgenre of crime fiction in which sex and violence are downplayed or treated humorously, and the crime and detection take place in a small, socially intimate community. Book list linked here.

 

   

 

25. Genre: Suspense: anything that fits into the suspense genre. Book list linked here.

26. Locked Room Mystery: a subgenre of detective fiction in which a crime (almost always murder) is committed in circumstances under which it was seemingly impossible for the perpetrator to commit the crime or evade detection in the course of getting in and out of the crime scene. Book list linked here.

27. Modern Noir:  mystery with noir elements, including authors like James Ellroy, Ian Rankin, anything that falls generally under the category of Nordic Noir, Tartan Noir, Granite Noir, etc; Book list linked here.

 

 

  

 

28. Romantic Suspense: any romance which has a significant sub-plot that involves mystery, thriller or suspense; also gothic romance. Book list linked here.

29. Serial/Spree Killer: a sub-genre of crime fiction that involves the detection of serial or spree killers. Book list linked here.

30. Murder Most Foul: any murder mystery. Book list linked here.

 

The Supernatural Squares:

 

  

 

31. Cryptozoologist: any supernatural creature, from Ammit to Ziz. Check out the book lists for monsters, vampires, shifters, or deadlands.

32. Deadlands:  elements of the undead - zombies, wights, vampires and other revenants; Book list linked here.

33. Ghost Stories: any story involving ghosts or hauntings - includes haunted houses. Book list linked here.

 

  

 

34. Magical Realism: a style of fiction that paints a realistic view of the modern world while also adding magical elements Book list linked here.

35. Shifters: werewolves, skin-walkers and all other therianthropes. Book list linked here.

36. Spellbound: books containing witches, warlocks, sorcerors and witchcraft; Book list linked here.

 

 

 

37. Supernatural: mystery, suspense or horror books which include elements that defy current understanding of the natural world, including magic, witchcraft and/or crypto-zoological aspects. Book list linked here.

38. Vampires: vampires, preferably non-sparkly, in all of their glorious fictional permutations. Book list linked here.

Reblogged from Moonlight Murder

All 61 squares revealed: 39 through 61

The remaining, non-genre specific squares - you can read anything that is horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural that otherwise fits the square prompt.

 

  

 

39. Thirteen (13): any book that relates to bad luck, superstition, or the number 13, either in the title/book/series/page count. Booklist linked here.

40. A Grimm Tale:  any fairy tale or retelling of fairy tales, folklore, legends, etc. Book list linked here.

41. Aliens: any mystery, horror, suspense or supernatural book that includes aliens, either here on earth, or in space. Book list linked here.

 

   

 

42. Creepy Carnivals:  horror/mystery/supernatural set in or concerning a carnival, amusement park, or other party/festival - think Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, Joyland by Stephen King or Hallowe'en Party by Agatha Christie; Book list linked here.

43. Creepy Crawlies: this is a throw back from 2016! Books with bugs, snakes, spiders, worms and other things that slither, scuttle or crawl, includes viruses and other parasites. Book list linked here.

44. In The Dark, Dark Woods: a mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural book in which the forest/woods plays a significant role, or which has a forest/woods on the cover. Book list linked here.

 

  

 

45. Darkest London: mystery, horror, supernatural, or suspense set in London. Book list linked here.

46. Demons: Any book involving demons, demonic possession or other such elements. Book list linked here.

47. Diverse voices: written by an author of color. Book list linked here

 

  

 

48. Doomsday:  anything related to the end of the world, doomsday cults, or a post-apocalypse world. Book list linked here.

49. Fear the Drowning Deep: books with sea-related elements: sea creatures, ships, and sharks. Book list linked here

50. Full Moon: a book with an image of the moon on the cover, the word moon in the title, or where a full moon figures prominently in the story. Book list linked here

 

  

 

51. Gothic: any book with significant: a genre or mode of literature and film that combines fiction and horror, death, and at times romance. Book list linked here.

52. Grave or Graveyard: Books that have a grave or graveyard on their covers, in their titles, or any book primarily set in a graveyard. Book list linked here.

53. Halloween: This is a combination of the "pumpkin" and the "halloween" squares from 2016. so, any book set on halloween or has halloween in the title or that has a pumpkin on the cover, or in the title, etc.. will work for this square. Book lists linked here: pumpkins and halloween

 

   

 

54. Monsters: This square covers any crytpozoological or mythological creature that isn't a vampire, werewolf, or demon. Or zombie. Book list linked here.

55. New Release: mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural that was published after 10/31/18.

56. Read by Flashlight or Candlelight: Back by popular request! Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror book - the trick here is to spend an hour or so reading by flashlight or candlelight. Take a picture and share it with us, if you want to!

 

  

 

57. Relics and Curiosities: concerning magical, supernatural or haunted objects, such as spell-books, talismans or swords; Book list linked here.

58. Sleepy Hollow: this is the new version of set in New England, with a shout-out to that most New England of all stories, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Book list linked here

59. Free square: Our friend, Poe, is back for his fourth outing!

 

 

 

60. Black Cat: We haven't seen this square since our first bingo game, back in 2016! Any book that has a black cat in the title, on the cover, or in the story. Book list linked here.

61. It Was A Dark and Stormy Night: This is another throwback to 2016 - any book that takes place on "a dark and stormy night." Book list linked here.

 

Reblogged from Moonlight Murder

New Space #9

 

 

Stranger Things: this is a twist on the past 80's Horror square, with elements of the television show - any horror that has supernatural elements, portal/parallel universes, government plots gone awry, or is set or was written in the 1980's.

Reblogged from Moonlight Murder