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Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
Alexandra Fuller, Lisette Lecat
Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea
Teffi, Irina Steinberg, Anne Marie Jackson, Robert Chandler, Elizabeth Chandler, Edythe C. Haber
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
Collection: The Tailor of Panama / Our Game / The Night Manager
John le Carré
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life
Liz Kalaugher, Matin Durrani
Progress: 127/304 pages
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection
Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry
The Woman In White
Wilkie Collins
Merlin Trilogy
Mary Stewart
Progress: 340/928 pages
Quartet in Autumn
Barbara Pym
Progress: 99/186 pages

Recently Added

The Saltmarsh Murders - Gladys Mitchell
Whose Body? - Dorothy L. Sayers, Mark Meadows
Women Warriors - Pamela D. Toler
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." ― Mae West


"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." ― Mark Twain


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." ― Robert A. Heinlein


"Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else." ― Judy Garland
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Reading progress update: I've read 54%.

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World - Stephen Brusatte, Patrick Lawlor The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World - Stephen Brusatte

Hmmm.  The science content is paleontology 101 (though the explanation of the factors that impacted the changes from one earth age to the next is quite accessible).  Only wiith regard to a few major species and subspecies do we get some sort of discussion of their basic attributes, strengths and weaknesses, however -- other creatures falling into the same bracket are basically name-dropped in as a lengthy list, without any discussion whatsoever.  Perhaps most importantly, though, this is another huge case of titular mislabelling -- this is about the author's own career, field trips, cooperation with other scientists, and about his personal heroes as well as the notable scientists of yesteryear, at least as much as it is about the dinosaurs themselves.  I'll finish it, but it's not anywhere near a five-star book.