10823

Currently Reading

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
Tom Reiss, Paul Michael
Der Gesang der Wellen
Manuel Vicent
Son de Mar
Manuel Vicent
Progress: 12 %
Thomas Cromwell: A Life
Diarmaid MacCulloch, David Rintoul
Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea
Teffi, Irina Steinberg, Anne Marie Jackson, Robert Chandler, Elizabeth Chandler, Edythe C. Haber
Thomas Cromwell: A Life
Diarmaid MacCulloch
The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
Tom Reiss
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection
Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry

Recently Added

Blindsight - Peter Watts
A First-Class Temperament: The Emergence of Franklin Roosevelt, 1905-1928 - Geoffrey C. Ward
Two Old Women: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival - Velma Wallis
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." ― Mae West


"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." ― Mark Twain


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." ― Robert A. Heinlein


"Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else." ― Judy Garland
Find me elsewhere:
My Leafmarks Profile
Project Hamlet

24 Festive Tasks: Door 13 - Advent, Book (or Short Story, actually)

A Study in Emerald - Jouni Koponen, Neil Gaiman

 

Shout-out to Arbie and Moonlight, who mentioned this elsewhere, with Moonlight sharing the link to the free copy available on Neil Gaiman's website.  Thank you both!

 

Also a huge shout-out to the story's illustrator, Jouni Koponen, who created a Victorian newspaper / tabloid / penny dreadful look, complete with a set of cleverly done, frankly hilarious period style mock advertisements (which are actually the best part of the whole thing).

 

Gaiman likes to spin literature classics from other genres (notably mysteries) through the Cthulhu myth; I imagine the temptation to give Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes canon the Lovecraft treatment was irresistable.  That said, in-jokes and allusions to Conan Doyle abound in text, structure, plot and characters alike; all the way to the solution, which is patterned on that of one of Holmes's most famous cases. -- I'll never like any pastiche anywhere near as much as the original, but as Holmes pastiches go, this one is well done; true enough to the original not to come across as disrespectful or mocking and at the same time with enough of a spin to make it clear that this cannot possibly be anything other than a pastiche.  From what little I know of the Cthulhu myth, I would hope that Lovecraft readers would say the same.

 

This came just in time for the Advent square in 24 Festive Tasks, so I'll claim it as my read for that square.