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The Mirror and the Light
Hilary Mantel, Ben Miles
Progress: 4 %
Fortunes of War: The Balkan Trilogy
Rachel Cusk, Olivia Manning
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
Merlin Trilogy
Mary Stewart
Progress: 612/928 pages
The Mirror and the Light
Hilary Mantel

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Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley, a Native African and a Slave - Phillis Wheatley, Melissa Summers
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"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." ― Mae West


"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." ― Mark Twain


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." ― Robert A. Heinlein


"Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else." ― Judy Garland
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Project Hamlet

Reading progress update: I've read 20 out of 320 pages (approximately).

Skeletons: The Frame of Life - Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams

Page count is approximate because I don't have the book with me at the moment.

 

Anyway, I made a start and finished the first chapter.  A very different tone from the likes of Brusatte, Kean and, in their own way, also Liz Kalaugher and Matin Durrani (the authors of Furry Logic).  And a welcome change, to be honest -- "oh look!  Fireworks!  Sparklers!  MeMeMe!" (the latter, only in Brusatte's and Kean's case, of course) may all be well and good for a while, at least if not used as an outlet for the author's own oversized ego, but it's a relief to see that there are some authors out there who care about their topic enough to talk about it in a straightforward manner without feeling the need to overemphasize things all the time.  (Even when they're talking about a development as sensational in pure science terms as the Cambrian explosion.)  Which includes, incidentally, the one or two paragraphs' worth of bare-bones information (each) on some of the scientists whose research and field work helped advance our understanding of those developments.  I'd say we're off to a solid start.

 

Note: The authors of this book shy away from using scientific terms and Latin species names decidedly less than those of some of the other books we've read recently.  The terms and species names are (mostly) explained, and it's not something I take issue with personally -- much to the contrary, in fact.  But together with the decidedly less conversational and more matter of fact tone, in and of itself this makes for a somewhat more "true science writing" feel than most of our recent reads.  To some readers, this may come across as a bit dry.