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The Lies of Locke Lamora
Scott Lynch, Michael Page
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
The Lies of Locke Lamora
Scott Lynch
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Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry
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Wilkie Collins
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Mary Stewart
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The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch, Michael Page
In the Hand of the Goddess - Tamora Pierce, Trini Alvarado
The Song of the Lioness Quartet: Alanna; In the Hand of the Goddess; The Woman Who Rides Like a Man; Lioness Rampant - Tamora Pierce
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." ― Mae West


"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." ― Mark Twain


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." ― Robert A. Heinlein


"Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else." ― Judy Garland
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24 Festive Tasks: Door 17 - Winter Solstice: Task 4 (Soyal)

The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales - Wilhelm Grimm, Jacob Grimm, Brothers Grimm, Joseph Campbell, Josef Scharl, Margaret Raine Hunt, Padraic Colum, James Stern The Complete Fairy Tales - Hans Christian Andersen Sämtliche Märchen - Wilhelm Hauff Aesop's Fables - Laura Gibbs, Aesop

My mom told or read me a good night fairy tale or fable almost every night when I was little -- mostly from the Brothers Grimm's collection, but also those by Hans-Christian Andersen and Wilhelm Hauff.  I generally preferred the Grimm tales over Andersen's, chiefly because they could be relied upon to have a happy ending (which is also why witches and evil giants didn't scare me one bit there -- I knew their ultimate purpose in the narrative was to be vanquished by the hero(ine); whereas in Andersen's tales that wasn't a given, and if the ending was sad, it was very sad indeed).  The stories I liked best, though, were those by Wilhelm Hauff: many of them were set in oriental or otherwise exotic settings in the undifferentiated "past" and were mischievously funny -- and those that had sad or serious aspects reached me much more forcefully than Andersen's.

 

As I said in another post, fairy tales and fables also made for the first audiobooks I owned, in the form of vinyl records that I learned to play way before I had reached elementary school and "reading" age.

 

(Task (Zuñi & Hopi / Native American): While systems of written symbols and communication already existed with the Pre-Columbian Native American cultures, to many tribes even today (including the Zuñi and Hopi) the oral tradition is still important.  Have you ever had stories told to you (e.g., as children’s bedtime stories, or at night during a camping vacation)?  Or if you haven’t, try to imagine a “storytelling” situation you’d like to experience?