8842

Currently Reading

The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee, Bob Reed
Collection: The Tailor of Panama / Our Game / The Night Manager
John le Carré
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions
Thomas McNamee
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection
Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry
The Woman In White
Wilkie Collins
Merlin Trilogy
Mary Stewart
Progress: 340/928 pages
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
Arthur Conan Doyle

Recently Added

Two Kinds of Truth - Michael Connelly, Titus Welliver
The Clock Strikes Twelve  - Diana Bishop, Patricia Wentworth
The Late Show - Michael Connelly
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." ― Mae West


"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." ― Mark Twain


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." ― Robert A. Heinlein


"Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else." ― Judy Garland
Find me elsewhere:
My Leafmarks Profile
Project Hamlet

Meet Charlie and Clint!

 

Some of you may remember that in summer 2017 I adopted this beautiful boy (photo left) and ultimately named him Teddy -- unfortunately, he was not even destined to stay with me for an entire year; I lost him in April 2018 and my heart is still bleeding for him.

 

You may also remember that he'd had quite a difficult life and thus required a fair amount of "investment", emotionally and otherwise.  Consequently, it also took quite a while for me to get over his loss (so much so, in fact, that I didn't even feel posting about it until now).

 

Then over the course of this summer work intervened, which was salutary in that it kept me (mostly) engaged elsewhere -- in addition to which, it also became clear that it wouldn't make much sense for me to start thinking about finding new cats as long as I didn't even have a clear picture how the rest of this year was going to pan out.

 

And then ... about a week after I'd returned from my belated "summer vacations" (in Corsica, the last week of October), I accidentally came across a complete stranger's tweet that someone else I'm following on Twitter had liked or commented on ... and they were looking for a new home for their cats.  And they were living in my area.

 

I went to see them last Sunday.  We -- the cats and me -- were instant friends.  (OK, the toys, treats and tuna I took may have helped ... but chiefly, it was all about love and attention.)  I hadn't brought any cat carriers, the idea of the visit having been nothing more than an initial get-to-know-you meeting, and of course, I hadn't been the only person to communicate my interest, either ... but by the end of my visit, it was clear how the chips had fallen.  So, they immediately came home with me after all, and I made a second trip to their former home that evening, returning their empty carriers. 

 

They spent the first night in hiding but started exploring their new home the very next day -- and now, not even a week later, they're already completely settled in; playing with complete abandon, cuddling with me in my bed (and pretty much everywhere else), and just generally being the best and most affectionate little boys ever.

 

So, everybody, meet my brandnew fur babies:

 

Charlie

... and Clint

They're 15 months old, brothers from the same litter -- born on a farm, but have grown up as indoor cats.  Charlie knows his name and it fits perfectly; Clint ultimately inherited the "Man with No Name"'s first name because his previous family couldn't make up their minds how to name him ... I'm pretty sure I'll be able to come up with something better (all the more because the name doesn't fit him at all), but I want to get to know him and watch him a little longer first.

24 Festive Tasks: Doors 3, 21 and 24 - Books for Melbourne Cup Day, Kwanzaa and Epiphany

Field of Thirteen - Dick Francis The Guards  - Ken Bruen, Gerry O'Brien The Clock Strikes Twelve  - Diana Bishop, Patricia Wentworth


Dick Francis: Field of Thirteen

I've owned this collection of short stories since forever and decided our Melbourne Cup Day book task was the perfect occation so pull it out and finally read it.  Candidly, I'm not sure why Dick Francis didn't write more short stories: both his style of writing and his plot construction lent themselves perfectly to the short form, and I tend to view even some of his novels as short story constructs extended to novel length rather than books conceived as novels in the first place (even though they probably were).  Be that as it may, this is a very enjoyable collection featuring some of Francis's best writing, set in the world of racehorse breeding (and stealing and betting), and against the great race events of Britain and the U.S., from the Grand National, Ascot, Sandown Park, the Marlborough Racing Club Gallops, Cheltenham and Stratford to the Kentucky Derby, plus the odd imaginary racetrack (unfortunately, not also the Melbourne Cup).  Not all of the mysteries involve a death, and not all the deaths that occur are caused intentionally -- word to the wise, however, steeplechase racing is a hazardous sport for humans and horses alike, and Francis makes no bones about this particular fact.

 


Ken Bruen: The Guards
(Narrator: Gerry O'Brien)

Ken Bruen's Jack Taylor series has been on my radar ever since I watched the first episode of its TV adapatation, starring Iain Glen.  The Guards provides as gut-punch an opener as is conceivable to the series; we see how and why Taylor is dismissed from the Gardaí Síochána, and though the motif of the loner detective who struggles not only at socializing but also with a range of other things, most notably including full-blown alcoholism, is a veritable staple in today's detective fiction, I can think of few other series where particularly the protagonist's addiction is explored this forthrightly (well, OK, Harry Hole comes to mind).  Taylor is -- literally -- not afraid to pull punches, but he is fiercly loyal to those to whom he feels loyalty is due ... and ready to take his loyalty all the way if necessary.  I've never been to County Galway, where the series is set, and I can't shake the feeling that I'd get even more out of it if I had, but even so, this is one series I'm glad to have finally added to those that I'm now following (and I'm not exactly sad I have a bunch of installments to catch up on first).  Gerry O'Brien's narration, too, did a stellar job in transporting the book's tone and atmosphere.

 

I listened to this for the Kwanzaa square (a book with a black cover). 

 


Patricia Wentworth: The Clock Strikes Twelve
(Narrator: Diana Bishop)

This came with high praise from both Tigus and Moonlight, so I knew I had a lot to look forward to -- and I was certainly not disappointed!  This is a New Year's Eve story and the "family patriarch publicly announces 'I know someone here has betrayed family interests and you've got until midnight to come forward and confess your sins'" classic mystery plot variant ... seriously, someone should have told those Golden Age family patriarchs not to do this sort of thing because it'll invariably get them killed.  Anyway, Wentworth had comfortably settled into her formula by the time she wrote this book, and I agree with Moonlight -- this is now my new favorite entry in the series, too.  Though written strictly to Wentworth's formula (cozy rural setting with bickering family [or village population], lovers to (re)bond, a reasonable but not impenetrable amount of red herrings, a perhaps not entirely unexpected villain, and an investigation by thoroughly compentent police inspectors who are, nevertheless, easily "bested" by Miss Silver), the characters and their various conflicts are finely and credibly drawn and jump off the page as real people ... and Miss Silver, as always, is a sheer delight.  Well done, Maudie!  And Patricia -- and Diana (Bishop), whose reading of the Miss Silver books I've thoroughly come to enjoy.

 

I'm counting this book towards the "Epiphany" square of "24 Festive Tasks" (a book with the word "twelve" in the title).

24 Festive Tasks: Door 5 - Veterans' / Armistice Day, Task 1 (Book Cover Flag)

Not anywhere as creative as some of the flags and poppies others have come up with, but then, there's only so much you can do with three solid bars of color, so here we go:

 

24 Festive Tasks: Door 6 - International Day for Tolerance


Guy Fawks Night

veteran's and armistace day

Diwali

dio de los meurtos
International Day of Tolerance

Melbourne Cup Day

 

The International Day for Tolerance -- observed on November 16 -- is an annual holiday intended to generate public awareness of the dangers of intolerance. It was declared by UNESCO in 1995, the UN's fiftieth anniversary year, which in turn was declared the United Nations Year for Tolerance. Every year since then, on November 16, various conferences and festivals are organized to mark the International Day for Tolerance; among them, the Universal Tolerance Cartoon Festival in Drammen, Norway, which organized an International Cartoon Festival in 2013. -- The winner of the biannual UNESCO-Madanjeet Singh Prize for the promotion of tolerance and non-violence, established in 1996 in connection with the 125th anniversary of the birth of Mahatma Gandhi, is also announced on the International Day for Tolerance. The US $100,000 award is given to individuals and institutions standing out for their exceptional contributions and leadership in the field of tolerance promotion, or to the families of outstanding individuals who have lost their lives in the struggle against intolerance. Past laureates include Myanmar politician and activist Aung San Suu Kyi (2002) and Bangladeshi-Swedish author and human rights activist Taslima Nasrin (2004).

 

Tasks and Books

International Day of Tolerance

Task 1:  Find some redeeming quality in the book you liked least this year and post about it.

 

Task 2: Tell us: What are the tropes (up to 5) that you are not willing to live with in any book (i.e., which are absolutely beyond your capacity for tolerance) and which make that book an automatic DNF for you? (Insta-love? Love triangles? First person present narrative voice? Talking animals? The dog dies? What else?)

 

Task 3: The International Day for Tolerance is a holiday declared by an international organization (UNESCO). Create a charter (humorous, serious, whatever strikes your fancy) for an international organization of readers.

 

Task 4: UNESCO is based in Paris. Paris is known for its pastries and its breads: Either find a baker that specializes in pastries and bring home an assortment for your family, or make your own pastries using real butter and share a photo with us.

 

Book:  Read any fiction/non-fiction about tolerance or a book that’s outside your normal comfort zone.  (Tolerance can encompass anything you generally struggle with, be it sentient or not.) OR Read a book set in Paris.

 

(Click "Read More" for the previous days' tasks and books.)

 

read more »

Reading progress update: I've read 5%.

The Guards  - Ken Bruen, Gerry O'Brien

A book with a black cover -- listening to this for the Kwanzaa square.  A series I've long wanted to look ino.

24 Festive Tasks: Doors 2 and 5 - Books for Guy Fawkes Night and Veterans' / Armistice Day

Behold, Here's Poison - Georgette Heyer Behold, Here's Poison - Georgette Heyer The Riddle of the Third Mile - Colin Dexter, Samuel  West The Riddle of the Third Mile - Colin Dexter


Georgette Heyer: Behold, Here's Poison
(Narrator: Ulli Birvé)

The first Georgette Heyer mysteries I read were her Inspector Hemingway books, which in a way meant I was starting from the wrong end, as Hemingway progressed to the rank of inspector from having been the lead investigator's sergeant in the earlier Superintendent Hannasyde books.  That doesn't impede my enjoyment of Hannasyde's cases in the least, however, now that I'm getting around to these, even though I found the first one (Death in the Stocks) seriously underwhelming.  But Heyer redeems herself in a big way with Behold, Here's Poison: Though a fair share of her mysteries have a sizeable contingent of 1920s-30s stock-in-trade bright young things and generally "nice chaps" (which got on my nerves enough at one point to make me decide I'd had enough of Heyer), when she did set her mind to it, nobody, not even Agatha Christie, did maliciously bickering families like her.  And the family taking center stage here must be one of the meanest she's ever come up with, only (just) surpassed by the Penhallows.  I'm not overwhelmed with the story's romantic dénouement (there always is one in Heyer's books), and while I guessed the mystery's essential "who" and had a basic idea of the "why" at about the 3/4 - 4/5 mark (the actual "why" was a bit of a deus ex machina), by and large this has to count among my favorite Heyer mysteries so far ... though not quite reaching the level of my overall favorite, Envious Casca.

 

Ulli Birvé isn't and won't ever become my favorite narrator, and she seriously got on my nerves here, too.  Since all of the recent re-recordings of Heyer's mysteries are narrated by her, though, I've decided I won't hold her mannerisms against the author, and I've read enough print versions of Heyer books at this point to have a fairly good idea of what a given character would sound like in my head if I'd read instead of listened to the book in question.

 

 


Colin Dexter: The Riddle of the Third Mile
(Narrator: Samuel West)

For Veterans' / Armistice Day I'm claiming the very first book I revisited after the beginning of the 24 Festive Tasks game: Colin Dexter's The Riddle of the Third Mile had long been one of my favorite entries in the Inspector Morse series, but Samuel West's wonderful reading not only confirmed that status but actually moved it up yet another few notches.  (Samuel West is fast becoming one of my favorite audiobook narrators anyway.) The fact that due to the progress of medical research a key element of the mystery would have been much easier to solve these days does not impede my enjoyment in the least ... changing social mores aside, half the Golden Age crime literature, including many of the great classics by Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and even, on occasion, Arthur Conan Doyle would be deprived of substantial riddles if they were set today. -- The book qualifies for this particular "24 Festive Tasks" square, because some of the characters' and their siblings' encounter as British soldiers at the battle of El Alamein (1942) forms the prologue to the book and an important motive for their actions in the world of Oxford academia and Soho strip clubs, some 40 years later.

Never Again


Munich today -- an art installation entitled "Never Again", centering on 3,000 poppies.

 

I don't have any photos of our family members who perished in WWI.  So representative of all of those lives lost to the devastating wars of the 20th century, I'm going to share the last photo we have of my mother's eldest cousin, the son of my maternal grandfather's eldest sister; taken July 15, 1944.  At age 18, he was drafted into Hitler's madcap final, futile attempt to fend off defeat, and was killed barely two months after this photo was taken, in September 1944, not even 19 years old.

 

Allied troups in the freezing 1914 trenches:

More WWI photos here: http://www.general-anzeiger-bonn.de/bilder/news/Diese-historischen-Fotos-zeigen-den-Ersten-Weltkrieg-article3976879.html

(Never mind the German legends; the images speak for themselves.)

 

The WWI armistice centenary around the world: https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2018/11/centenary-end-of-world-war-i/575224/

24 Festive Tasks: Door 5 - Veterans' / Armistice Day


Guy Fawks Night

veteran's and armistace day

Diwali

dio de los meurtos

Melbourne Cup Day

 

Armistice Day is commemorated every year on November 11 to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of WW I, which took effect at 11:00 AM – the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" of 1918.  The date was declared a national holiday in many allied nations, and coincides with Remembrance Day in the British Commonwealth and Veterans’ Day in the U.S., both public holidays.  The poppy became the international symbol of the day as a result of its being mentioned in the poem In Flanders Fields by Canadian physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, which commemorates the fallen soldiers buried under the Flanders poppy fields.

 

Tasks and Book

Diwali

Task 1:  Using book covers (real or virtual), create a close approximation of your country’s flag (either of residence or birth), OR a close approximation of a poppy.  Take a pic of your efforts and post.

 

Task 2: Make an offer of peace (letter, gift, whatever) to a book character who has particularly annoyed you this year.

 

Task 3: Tell us: What author’s books would you consider yourself a veteran of (i.e., by which author have you read particularly many books – or maybe even all of them)?

 

Task 4: Treat yourself to a slice of poppy seedcake and post a photo. If you want to make it yourself, try out this recipe: https://tastesbetterfromscratch.com/poppy-seed-cake/ … or this one: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1629633/lemon-and-poppy-seed-cake

 

Book:  Read any book involving wars, battles, where characters are active military or veterans, or with poppies on the cover.

 

(Click "Read More" for the previous days' tasks and books.)

 

read more »

Reading progress update: I've listened to 30 out of 636 minutes.

Behold, Here's Poison - Georgette Heyer

I'm listening to this for the "Guy Fawkes Night" book task (a book set in the UK).

24 Festive Tasks: First Week Summary and Preview for the Rest of the Month

Wow, the first week is almost over, my dashboard and notifications have exploded beyond all proportions, and I'm just blown away by the enthusiasm this is generating, coming as it does straight on the back of the best Halloween Bingo we've had in 3 years!

 

For the lovers of statistics, here's a summary snapshot of the first week's results -- minus the books some have already read for the final 7 holidays, though (right-click on the image and select "show / display" to see a larger version ... and please don't ask my why Excel chose to show the participants' names in reverse alphabetical order):

 

The tasks completed most frequently so far were:

 

* Melbourne Cup Day "pick your ponies" with a whopping 22 participants and 36 points total collected,

* Día de los Muertos -- your favorite epitaph (16 participants)

... and on equal footing with 12 participants each:

* Guy Fawkes Night -- burn a book in effigy

* Guy Fawkes Night -- 3 worst book-related crimes

* Diwali -- book covers: young women holding flowers

 

 

In the coming 3 weeks (each week beginning on Sunday for purposes of the 24 Festive Tasks), we will be opening:

 

* 2 doors next week (=2d week of November)

* 4 doors in the third week of November and

* 2 doors again in the final week of November.

 

Happy (rest of the) Festive Season, everybody ... let the games continue as merry as they've begun!

 

ADDENDUM: And please remember to report your progress in the bingo group!  It not only makes creating posts like this one so much easier ... it's also an enormous help in keeping tabs on the total number of points collected, which will, after all, ultimately determine the amount the hosts are going to contribute to charity.  THANK YOU!

 

Reblogged from Themis-Athena's Garden of Books

24 Festive Tasks: First Week Summary and Preview for the Rest of the Month

Wow, the first week is almost over, my dashboard and notifications have exploded beyond all proportions, and I'm just blown away by the enthusiasm this is generating, coming as it does straight on the back of the best Halloween Bingo we've had in 3 years!

 

For the lovers of statistics, here's a summary snapshot of the first week's results -- minus the books some have already read for the final 7 holidays, though (right-click on the image and select "show / display" to see a larger version ... and please don't ask my why Excel chose to show the participants' names in reverse alphabetical order):

 

The tasks completed most frequently so far were:

 

* Melbourne Cup Day "pick your ponies" with a whopping 22 participants and 36 points total collected,

* Día de los Muertos -- your favorite epitaph (16 participants)

... and on equal footing with 12 participants each:

* Guy Fawkes Night -- burn a book in effigy

* Guy Fawkes Night -- 3 worst book-related crimes

* Diwali -- book covers: young women holding flowers

 

 

In the coming 3 weeks (each week beginning on Sunday for purposes of the 24 Festive Tasks), we will be opening:

 

* 2 doors next week (=2d week of November)

* 4 doors in the third week of November and

* 2 doors again in the final week of November.

 

Happy (rest of the) Festive Season, everybody ... let the games continue as merry as they've begun!

 

ADDENDUM: And please remember to report your progress in the bingo group!  It not only makes creating posts like this one so much easier ... it's also an enormous help in keeping tabs on the total number of points collected, which will, after all, ultimately determine the amount the hosts are going to contribute to charity.  THANK YOU!

 

24 Festive Tasks: Master Update Post

 

 

MARKERS:

Books: Meteor

Tasks: Bows

 

 

 

DOOR 1: DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS

Book:  Agatha Christie: Miss Marple - The Complete Short Stories (audio version, narrated by Joan Hickson, Isla Blair and Anna Massey)

Task 1:

Task 2: Favorite epitaph (William Shakespeare, Stratford-upon-Avon)

Task 3: Sherlock Holmes altar

Task 4: Mexican food

 

Points: 4

 

 

DOOR 2: GUY FAWKES NIGHT

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2: Book-related crimes

Task 3: Favorite food "flambé (vanilla ice cream and hot cherries)

Task 4: "Non-explosive" "Gunpowder" titles

 

Points:  3

 

 

DOOR 3: MELBOURNE CUP DAY

Book: Dick Francis: Field of Thirteen

Task 1: Pick your ponies: A Prince of Arran, The Cliffsofmoher, Sound Check  (=> 1 point for participation + 1 point for getting 1 horse right)

Task 2: Hats

Task 3:

Task 4: Hamburg Derby & CHIO

 

Points: 4

 

 

DOOR 4: DIWALI

Book:

Task 1: Bonn leuchtet / Bonn Shines (favorite light display)

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4: Book covers (girls holding flowers)

 

Points: 2

 

 

DOOR 5:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 6:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 7:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 8:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 9:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 10:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

DOOR 11:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 12:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 13:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 14:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 15:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 16:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 17:

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 18: WINTER SOLSTICE / YULETIDE

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 19: FESTIVUS

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 20: CHRISTMAS

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 21: KWANZAA

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 22: NEW YEAR'S EVE

Book: Stephen Brusatte: The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points: 1

 

 

DOOR 23: HOGSWATCH

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

DOOR 24: EPIPHANY

Book:

Task 1:

Task 2:

Task 3:

Task 4:

 

Points:

 

 

 

BOOK JOKER

 Used for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running Total Score:

 

 14 points

Reading progress update: I've read 80 out of 289 pages.

Field of Thirteen - Dick Francis

Reading this for the 24 Festive Tasks Melbourne Cup Day square: A set of 13 short stories set in the world of horse racing.  One of them (Blind Chance) I recently read, under a different title (Twenty-one Good Men and True), as part of the Verdict of Thirteen anthology for the Halloween Bingo "13" square and won't be rereading it.  The others are new to me, though, and so far very enjoyable.

24 Festive Tasks: Door 4 - Diwali, Task 1 (Favorite Light Display)

"Bonn leuchtet" -- "Bonn Shines" -- is the name of an annual event in early November during which some of Bonn's public buildings (and city streets and trees) are colorfully illuminated at night.  Here are a few impressions from this year's iteration:

 

Old City Hall (and Market Place):

Sterntor (the only remaining medieval gate / remnant of city wall):

A bit of fun fair atmosphere (thankfully not too much, though):

Main Post Office and statue of Beethoven:


... aaand Bonn University (with Old City Hall in the background):

24 Festive Tasks: Door 1 - Día de los Muertos, Task 4 (Mexican Food)

Mini beef tortillas with potato wedges, sourcream, and a dip that's half salsa and half guacamole.

 

Ordered in, not my own creation ... I couldn't be bothered to cook, having had to go into Cologne because my iphone was on strike and Apple STILL doesn't have location in Bonn where there are actually technicians as well, which pretty much killed my entire afternoon.  (Stopping by IKEA on the way home for another bookshelf, for the "leftovers" I hadn't been able to give a home in the big shelf makeover the other week, was child's play in comparison.)

 

I hadn't been planning on any dessert, but after Wanda's mouthwatering "Orange Gingerbread" post decided to treat myself to some of these, in the spirit of the Mexican theme:

 

24 Festive Tasks: Door 4 - Diwali, Task 4 (Book Covers: Young Women Holding Flowers)

Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy, John Bayley, Larissa Volokhonsky, Richard Pevear Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon - Jorge Amado The Third Wedding - Costas Taktsis, Κώστας Ταχτσής Cousin Phillis - Elizabeth Gaskell, Joe Marsh The Virgin in the Garden - A.S. Byatt The Bride Wore Black - William Irish, Cornell Woolrich The Rose Rent - Ellis Peters Goldengirl - Peter Lear Death in the Stocks - Georgette Heyer The Pursuit of Love - Nancy Mitford

Bookshelves: Classics, Women Writers, International (resp. various country / language shelves), Mysteries, Historical Fiction

 

I'm not a romance reader at all, but I've found ladies holding flowers (actually more than I could attach to this post) in unexpected places ...